McKenna Grace on Annabelle Comes Home: I knew it was going to be challenging


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Comment(s) Beforehand, you’re like, ‘Oh, this is going to be so scary, I’m so excited but I’m scared.’ And then afterwards you can laugh and think, ‘Wow, that was crazy, I want to watch it again!” Mckenna said. Or maybe they’re not just in her head. One night, Annabelle awakens the evil spirits of the room containing cursed artifacts collected by the Warrens and horror ensues. Mckenna spoke about her character and getting the role. But an unholy night of horror awaits as Annabelle awakens the evil spirits in the room, who all set their sights on a new target—the Warrens’ ten-year-old daughter, Judy, and her friends.”
Annabelle Comes Home releases on June 28. But I was so excited!”

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She also revealed she is a huge fan of the horror genre and of James Wan himself, the man behind the Conjuring universe. Advertising

Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga’s Ed and Lorraine Warren are also in the film, a first for the Annabelle franchise. “My dad and I like to watch horror movies together on weekends, and I just think that they’re really good and James Wan is a genius. I really like the adrenaline. I knew it was going to be challenging because there’s a lot of crying and screaming… basically the whole movie. She is also dealing with being a little ostracised at school as the community is just now getting a sense of what her parents do via their work being written up in the local newspapers. But the film is mostly about Mckenna Grace’s Judy Warren, the daughter of Ed and Lorraine. The film’s official synopsis reads, “Determined to keep Annabelle from wreaking more havoc, demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren bring the possessed doll to the locked artifacts room in their home, placing her safely behind sacred glass and enlisting a priest’s holy blessing. She said, “My character has powers kind of like her mom; she can see visions, and I think she is a little insecure about it, because it’s very frightening, seeing all these images in her head. She feels a bit like an outcast, because kids at school tease her or don’t want to be her friend.”

She added, “I found out I got the role while I was at cheerleading practice and I had to sit out for a minute.